Tag Archives: communication

Where Is IT On Your Customer Journey Map?

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In today’s digital world, it’s imperative that organizations create and deliver world-class customer experiences. The Amazons and Zappos of the world have changed how customers want and expect to interact with organizations, especially online. Customers expect continual updates, easy to use self-service options, and streamlined processes, from start to finish.

This means organizations must research, understand and optimize every part of their customer’s journey. This process of documenting a customer’s journey was once thought to be a job for externally-facing departments, such as marketing or customer service.

But this siloed style of operations won’t work today. Today the modern C-suite must work together to create customer journey maps and, most importantly, IT must include themselves on those maps. The good news is that the door is wide open for CIOs to grab this opportunity.

What are Customer Journey Maps?

Before IT can make sure they’re properly included on customer journey maps, let’s address what we are referring to when we discuss these maps.

Customer journey maps are documents that help organizations visualize and understand how they attract and retain customers, and how customers interact with the organization. These documents depict each touchpoint a prospective customer may have with an organization. Touchpoints include interactions like a customer visiting their website, placing an order, contacting customer support, and leaving a review. Customer journey mapping provides a 360-degree view of a customer’s wants and needs.

Why are Customer Journey Maps important?

As I pointed out earlier, customers expect world-class experiences from every organization they interact with, no matter how large or small. According to Oracle’s Customer Experience Impact Report, 86% of buyers are willing to pay more for a better experience with a brand. They expect a seamless purchase experience and if they don’t find it with your organization, they will quickly go find it somewhere else. The internet has limitless options for today’s consumers, so the best way to win is to provide a flawless experience.

Additionally, we live in an interconnected world, and a bad customer experience often doesn’t stop as soon as the person hits “cancel order.” Many customers will take to social media and review sites to broadcast about the experience, which could negatively impact future sales with other potential customers. According to Temkin, 30% of consumers tell the company after a bad experience. But 50% of those consumers tell their friends, and 15% of those consumers provide feedback online. It’s easy to see how a single bad customer experience doesn’t just impact one customer.

A customer journey map can also reduce the number of assumptions that your organization is likely making about your customers. It’s natural for certain biases to exist when it comes to how your audience interacts with your organization. It’s important to look at the data instead of trusting the beliefs or views of internal teams.

Why does IT need to play a role?

Perhaps a decade ago, it was unlikely that IT would have been a part of these customer journey mapping experiences. But today, IT has to be a part of the exercise because technology is a key component in delivering a seamless customer experience.

For example, one of the leading trends in customer experience is personalization. 80% of consumers are more likely to purchase from brands that offer a personalized experience. To create a personalized experience, like offering relevant product suggestions or targeted ads, requires the use of technology to track and store data about a consumer’s behavior. Even though this may sound like a marketing task, it will be IT that will be implementing the technology and managing the data. Therefore, IT must understand why this technology is necessary and have a role in how it should be implemented and leveraged.

What Should IT Do to Be Involved?

Creating a customer journey map is a collaborative project. The best first step any CIO can take to be a part of this project is to break down any silos or any competing goals that may exist with other departments. No single department can “own” the customer journey map. Either everyone is on board and in consensus or you have a flawed map.

The actual creation of the map requires both quantitative and qualitative data. Since CIOs and IT rarely directly interacts with consumers, they won’t have much qualitative data. However, they will have quantitative data found within the systems of engagement and systems of record. The CIO should deliver whatever data they may have about the customer experience, whether that is customer analytics or website data.

Finally, it’s important to remember the overall goal of this experience: it’s to delight the customer in every phase of their journey with you. IT can often hold preconceived notions of what’s the best technology or tool or they can have doubts over whether technology is necessary. These beliefs will only put up roadblocks in the process. Let the needs of the customer drive this process. As Steve Jobs once said back in 1995, “You’ve got to start with the customer experience and work back to the technology — not the other way around.” For CIOs to succeed they must open their eyes to the journey the customer is on and then work to support it.

Customer journey mapping is an important exercise that every organization should do and IT shouldn’t miss out on the opportunity to help shape the experience for the customer. By bringing the right data, clarifying the needs and understanding the wants, IT can deliver the technology that will enable fantastic customer experiences and support the company in their business goals.

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The New Role of The ITSM Professional

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What makes ITSM successful? There are many answers for this question but I am staunchly in the camp that ITSM success has less to do with strategy, processes, or even technology. It comes down to people.

There might be some argument about this belief within the industry, especially as we become more automated. There is a very real fear among many ITSM professionals that embracing AI means that they will soon be replaced by machines. My unpopular opinion on this is that while some ITSM professionals will be automated out of a job, it doesn’t mean that their ITSM careers are done. I believe that there will be new roles that will emerge for those professionals.

ITSM is evolving. We have new technologies and new methodologies – so it’s time that we look at a new way of defining the ITSM professional. As we enter this new decade in 2020, I’d argue that we must redefine the role of the ITSM professional. I see the role coming down to two crucial parts.

The Business of the Business

The first part of this new ITSM professional role is the importance of understanding “the business of the business.”

In other words, how does the business co-create value? What do end-users and customers want and expect from the business? Many ITSM professionals understand how processes and technology work, but often fail to see the bigger picture of how those processes and technology support the value streams across the business and, ultimately, the bottom line.

ITSM professionals have a unique opportunity. While many within the organization may understand the business of the business, few understand the relationships between value streams and technologies, and how technology supports the business of the business.

By working with their teams to understand the business and its bottom line – and the role of technology and service management – CIOs can enable their team members to become so valuable that they can’t be automated out of a job.

AI and machine learning are only as good as the data they are given. If the ITSM professional understands the value streams that flow through the business – that is, the business of the business – then they can ensure that good service management underpins the flow of that data used to make those business decisions that impact the bottom line.

The Soft Skills of the ITSM Professional

The second piece of the new ITSM professional is soft skills. Don’t be fooled by the phrase. Soft skills are crucial for success and there is nothing “soft” about them. In the new ITSM role, the professional must effectively communicate with others, work with the rest of the organization, and have an understanding of what each department contributes to the bottom line.

Silo mentality can no longer be tolerated. A “culture of no” won’t last in this new paradigm. Communication and collaboration are “must-haves”. If your team is feeling resistant about the necessity of working with the rest of the organization, encourage them to recognize that in order to be seen as an integral part of the organization and not a back-office support team then they must step out from behind their computers and collaborate with the rest of the organization.

With the right mindset, a focus on communication and collaboration, and an understanding of the business, this new ITSM professional will thrive in any organization. Yes, even in a world with automation, bots, and machine learning.

Focus on Service

If this shift feels overwhelming or uncomfortable, I encourage IT, leaders, to emphasize the meaning of the word “service” with their teams. We define and create what are called “services”, but too many ITSM professionals think of services in terms of processes, methodologies, and technologies.

The word service can be defined as “the action of a person (or organization) helping or doing work for someone else.” Services are more about people, about working together and helping others than they are about technology and methodologies.

These shifts, whether you view them as large or small, are unavoidable. IT can’t afford to duck their heads behind their computers and hope their knowledge of technology and methodologies will be enough to keep them relevant. They must see the larger picture and work with the rest of the organization to achieve that larger picture.

It’s time to raise the bar.

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The Curious Case of the Wasted IT Investment

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There’s no doubt that if you want to be an efficient IT organization, you need efficient tools. Some might say that you need the best tools.

But when happens when those tool investments fail? And perhaps, more importantly, how do you prevent poor investments from ever happening again?

Here’s a story that might sound familiar to you of a (fictional) company who made an investment in a tool and then failed to see any return for it – and what they did to improve.

The Curious Case of the Wasted IT Investment

Dwight is a CIO for a mid-sized organization. He recently convinced his boss, the CEO, Lynn, that they needed to make a significant investment in a service management tool.

Lynn, recognizing that technology was more important than ever and there were increasingly more demands on the IT organization, agreed that IT needed the best tool on the market. They agreed that they needed a tool that would grow as that demand grew. They needed a tool that would help IT drive consistency and repeatability in process execution, but at the same time, facilitate innovation as new business drivers emerged. And while they had only developed and implemented a few service management practices, they anticipated that they would need the capability to support additional service management capabilities as the organization continued to digitize its operations. It wouldn’t be too long before the organization would need to leverage capabilities like automation, process orchestration, and chatbots. And frankly, their current service management tool had seen its better days – it was time to get a modern service management tool. Perhaps even a tool that could be used within other parts of the organization!

They decided to invest in the most expensive, fully featured service management tool on the market. It truly could do anything that they wanted to do…and more!

Dwight, Lynn and the entire team were delighted with their choice! The tool can do everything. It will undoubtedly solve all of their service management issues.

But a few weeks go by, then a few months… and both Dwight and Lynn are noticing that things aren’t improving. Even with the fancy new tool, Dwight can’t get all of the information he needs to present his updates to Lynn, who wants to see that improvement and consistent performance from the use of this tool. The IT organization still isn’t doing things in a repeatable way and many team members are still performing tasks manually. Processes are still disjointed and information does not flow well from process to process – and automation is nowhere close to becoming a reality for the IT organization. Dwight consistently ends up scrambling to gather data for the management reporting needed by Lynn.

Lynn is beginning to wonder why they decided to invest in modernizing the IT organization with this tool. Meanwhile, Dwight is worried that they failed in their modernization. He is seeing other departments prove their ROI and he is fearful that he blew their budget and won’t be able to convince Lynn ever again to invest in tools.

If you purchase the most capable tool, then how do things go wrong? The problem was never in the tool. The problem was before the tool and therefore, the tool can’t fix the problem. It’s like trying to build a house on quicksand. No matter what materials you use to build the house, it’s not going to stop it from sinking until you deal with the quicksand problem.

Let’s start with where Lynn and Dwight made their mistakes.
The first mistake is thinking a tool investment was the key to modernizing IT. A tool should never be your first investment. Are tools important? Absolutely! But a tool-first mentality ignores the most important part of your organization: the people using that tool.

Let’s start with the members of IT and how they need to be a part of modernization.

Lynn and Dwight should have asked themselves:

  • Do the members of IT understand why we’re investing in this tool?
  • Do they understand what role the tool will play in their everyday work?
  • Do they know how the tool will improve their work?
  • Have they been properly trained to use every part of the tool?

The mindset and buy-in from the team is important above all because these are the individuals who will be using the tool and ensuring it’s providing maximum return. When they feel they are part of the decision-making process, they will be more invested in learning and working with the tool. If everyone in the organization is invested in working with the tool, they’ll take the time to learn it and master it so that they are actually seeing all of the benefits of its many features.

The next thing Dwight should have addressed is the organization’s processes. Dwight should have ensured his processes were clearly defined, documented and adaptable. Then he should have identified how the tool will enable those processes, and communicate the processes and the tool’s role across departments and within the IT organization.

Defining (or redefining) processes will remove any ambiguity in service delivery. It ensures that there is transparency within IT. And Dwight and Lynn will have a clear idea of how the tool is working – and how well IT is able to contribute to business outcomes.
These steps seem simple, don’t they? But Dwight and Lynn skipped them because they were so certain that investing in the premium tool would instantly (and easily) fix all of their problems. Instead, they ended up in the exact same place they were before they purchased the tool – only now they’re spending a boatload of cash, and not getting the return they had hoped. A curious case of a wasted IT investment.

The lesson for every CIO, CFO, and CEO?

Don’t invest in a tool thinking it will solve the problem. If your car wasn’t working properly, you wouldn’t just purchase a new engine and think it will do the trick. You’d pop open the hood and find out exactly what’s not working then find the part that will fix it. If there’s somewhere in your organization that isn’t operating efficiently, try popping open the hood and doing the work to find the problem before you invest in a high-price, fully-featured tool.

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The Ultimate Guide to Measuring IT Success in the Digital Age

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You’ve probably heard the old adage that “you can’t manage what you don’t measure.” While the saying is technically true, it can be misconstrued, especially in IT.

IT has no shortage of measurable tasks. Most IT organizations have been using the same metrics for decades. KPIs like cost per ticket, ticket close time, user self-service completion rate and technician resolution are popular metrics that many CIOs use to determine the success of their IT organization.

But do those rates tell the real story of what’s happening in IT? I’m going to argue that they do not. In order to succeed in the digital age, CIOs must identify new ways to measure success.

The Problem with the “Old Way”

IT is no longer just a support team. Now IT plays a critical role in delivering services to end-users (read “customers of the business”) and can be a driver of business growth within the organization.
Old metrics simply will not measure success in the digital world. Look at the examples of common IT metrics that I listed above: cost per ticket, ticket close time, user self-service completion rate and technician resolution. These are not bad metrics and there is value in measuring them but they certainly don’t give a holistic view of how IT is contributing to the business.

An IT organization could hit every one of those example metrics but still be seen as a cost center instead of a contributor.
While CIOs understand the importance of these metrics, business leaders like the CEO and the CFO may not understand the importance of them. It’s the CIO’s job to use these metrics to point to the bigger picture and demonstrate how those metrics increase business value.

IT metrics need to also tell the whole story, from historical data and into the future. Business leaders should be able to look at IT metrics and understand where the organization has been and what direction it must take to move forward.

Metrics in the Age of Digital Transformation

Metrics in the age of digital transformation can be summed up in one sentence:

Metrics should connect to end-users and the business.

This appears to be a struggle for many organizations. A Gartner study found that only 31% of organizations have IT metrics in place to improve business operations.

If you cannot connect a metric to the end-user, you will struggle to demonstrate business value. This often requires the CIO to take a step back and look at the bigger picture of the business so that they have an understanding of the entire business model.

Metrics should also lead to definable actions – and those actions may touch several different areas of the business. This is important to note because it is going to move IT organizations away from having a silo mentality. IT touches almost every part of the business. CIOs need to collaborate with other areas of the business to determine where IT plays a role and how IT can provide the necessary resources to produce results.

Once you begin working with other parts of the business to identify where IT drives business value, you can then begin to build actionable process and systems and identifying key metrics for success within each one.

The Future of Measuring IT Success

IT metrics shouldn’t just measure technology performance. They should:

  • Track and trend performance over time
  • Diagnose and understand the underlying drivers of performance gaps
  • Prescribe actions to improve performance
  • Establish performance goals for both technicians and IT support overall

Every organization will have unique metrics but there are some starting points you can use to determine your initial metrics to ensure you’re properly measuring IT success in the digital age.

1. Cost and revenue indicators

Digital transformation is changing operational costs and customer acquisition costs. As technology evolves, pay attention to where those costs are, what can potentially be reduced, and where new business models or revenue streams are generated through leveraging technology.

2. Utilization

IT is often seen as a cost center because of the constant need for tools and technology. It’s important to measure utilization of these different tools and the impact of IT tools on business goals.

3. User experience

Are the other employees in the organization engaged with the tools and processes you have made available to them? What is the general level of productivity and business efficiency in the organization? If the users are enjoying a seamless experience and are able to identify productivity in their jobs because of the tools, technology and processes you have defined then you are able to IT’s role in business growth.

4. Customer experience

Finally, in the digital age, IT has a critically important role in providing the overall customer experience. IT can support the business in projects that improve the customer experience. CIOs need to inquire on how each project they play a role is impacting or enabling the right customer experience.

Pay attention to these four areas as you address new projects. If you begin to align your projects to support these areas, you will be able to identify relevant metrics that align with business success.

The Future is Here

The future of IT is already here. The bots have arrived, customer’s expectations have shifted, and the way we work has changed. So it’s time for your measures of success to do the same. If you are leading an IT organization, work with your peers to take a holistic view of business so you can begin to shift your IT metrics to reflect the success of the organization.

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Flipping the ESM Switch: Pressure Off, Ease On

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There’s a buzz around Enterprise Service Management (ESM) these days and with good reason! I see Enterprise Service Management as the future of Service Management. With the ever-increasing business reliance on the use of technology, more organizations will need to adopt Enterprise Service Management.

But what exactly does ESM do for your business and, more importantly, how can you start to implement it without complicating it?

At its core, ESM is applying IT Service Management concepts to the entire enterprise. It makes it easier to provide solutions to colleagues within your organization and to deliver value to customers outside of your organization.

While ESM is not about reinventing the wheel, it’s certainly not about force-fitting every department into established ITSM processes and workflows.

Implementing ESM is about leveraging what you have to make your tools, processes, and teams work better so that you can drive the same business value across the organization. It should flip the switch from pressure to ease.

Let’s look at some areas where ESM will ease the pressure within your organization.

Pressure:
“Other teams will insist on having it their way and using their tools and processes.”

Every department has its own defined set of processes, tools, and workflows. This can create a power struggle where each department is certain that their way is the best option. This can create difficulties during ESM implementation as each department could try to force others into adopting their processes or tools.

Ease:
“We are all working toward a common goal so there is no longer ‘my way’ and ‘your way’ – it’s now ‘our way’. “

The fundamental shift that must occur for ESM to be successful is to let go of the notion of independent goals and objectives. Every department, every team, every individual must be aligned with the overall goals of the organization. No matter your role in the organization: HR, accounting, marketing or IT, everyone is working to serve the customer. Department leaders and the C-suite must coach their teams to stay focused on these goals. If the organization is aligned on shared, common goals, it will be easier to adjust processes and workflows that work best to meet customer demands.

Pressure:
“My department is unappreciated and burnt out.”

Contrary to popular belief, it is not only members of the IT organization who often feel burnt out and unappreciated. In many organizations, every team member can feel as if their work goes unnoticed and unappreciated. When teams are focused on internal goals and not on organizational goals, teams fall into working in their own silo. One of the results of this silo mentality is that no one is clear on who is accomplishing what within the organization, which makes it difficult to understand how everyone contributes to organizational goals.

Ease:
“ESM results in clearly defined end-to-end processes, which means every part of the team will understand who contributes and how.”

Good ESM makes it easier to assign and see responsibility and accountability across each service or product. Not only does this hold everyone accountable for completing their piece of the process, but every team will be able to clearly be recognized for how they contribute. This can be the motivation that many team members need to keep contributing and to respect the other departments also involved in the delivery of services and products.

Pressure:
“Our department does its job and meets our part of the process – it’s other departments that drop the ball.”

Ease:
“Enterprise Service Management provides increased visibility and performance and helps management understand what has been achieved.”

Good ESM processes help provide insight into the value that each business function provides and communicates that value to customers and other business stakeholders. With Enterprise Service Management, no one can drop the ball because everyone knows who is in charge of what aspect of the process. There are clear communication channels and a high degree of visibility and transparency. Leaders must encourage their teams to embrace this as it will identify gaps, provide clear insight into contributions, and eliminates “blame” culture.

If you feel any of these pressures, then it may be time to introduce the ease of Enterprise Service Management. How can you start implementing it in your organization with ease instead of friction?

1. Justify Enterprise Service Management in business terms

ESM doesn’t always sell itself. Just like any change in an organization, the benefits need to be articulated in business terms. Explain the actual business benefits including revenue, competitive advantage or enhanced customer experience. Look at how many hours ESM can save from eliminating inefficiencies and miscommunications and how it can bring even more value to the organization.

2. Don’t treat ESM as ITSM

ESM cannot be an IT project. ESM is not about simply extending ITSM into the enterprise. It’s an organizational change that impacts every member of the team. Remember, ESM is about leveraging what you already have in place — and that includes every process and perhaps tools other departments use, as well. It must feel collaborative and inclusive to everyone in the organization

3. Respect the holdouts

It’s natural for some departments in your organization to fully embrace ESM and for others to be more resistant to this change. Instead of marginalizing the departments who are holding out on ESM, work with them to show how ESM can benefit their team. If ESM is going to be successful, every team needs to be willing to accept and try it. Forcing Enterprise Service Management on a department will only cause problems down the road. By continuing to emphasize the collaborative nature of ESM and the ability for every team member to be heard, you will be able to win over those holdouts.

4. IT- Focus on yourself first

IT can drive ESM, but there is no point extending sub-optimal service management practices outside of IT. If your ITSM processes are not meeting your needs, or if your own team is struggling with certain aspects of ITSM, focus on cleaning up in-house before trying to extend service management into the enterprise. If you are having successes from ITSM efforts, then your argument for ESM will be more impactful and you’ll have an easier time extending it throughout the enterprise.

ESM is not a passing fad. As more customers expect more personalization and self-service, the need for ESM is only going to increase. The best way to maintain a competitive advantage and keep your customers happy is to start implementing ESM in your organization today.

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What IT Organizations Can Learn From the Indy 500

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If you live or work in Indianapolis, then you know that May is all about the Indy 500.

Known as “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing,” the Indy 500 features 33 of the top racecar drivers racing for 200 laps to complete 500 miles at the fastest time.

It’s a fun event for everyone to witness. But for CIOs and IT leaders, it can also be a learning lesson in speed, agility, and teamwork.

How do race cars racing in a loop at speeds over 200 mph relate to IT organizations? While on the surface, it seems as though IT organizations and the Indy 500 have nothing in common. But, there are actually quite a few similarities between winning the Indy 500 and leading a highly efficient IT organization.

For most drivers, winning the Indy 500 will come down to the pit crew. The pit crew is a team of mechanics who work on the racecars during the “pit stops” of a race. Pit crews perform the work of refueling, changing tires, or any mechanical adjustments needed during the race.

The pit crew is a lot like the IT organization of a business. They might not be the face of the race team, but they do the heavy lifting that helps the driver win the race. Much like the IT team who implements and manages the technology that keeps businesses growing, winning customers, and enabling value.

Let’s look at some of the hallmarks of a great pit crew and how that compares to a great IT team.

A Great Pit Crew Will:

1. Work together to accomplish their goals
Everyone has a defined role on a pit team, and there is no room for a single superstar. No matter how fast one person is at completing their job, the driver can’t leave the pit until everyone has done their job. As Derrell Edwards, a jackman for NASCAR’s No. 27 Richard Childress Racing crew once said, “Pit crewing is like a symphony. Everything has to be in sync for it to sound good.”

A great IT organization must also put the goals of the business above any individual needs or preferences. They must abandon any silo mentality they may have and focus on the success of the team – the business – ahead of the success of individuals.

2. Have defined roles and processes
Speed is essential in a great pit crew, however, it’s just as essential for everyone to stay out of everyone else’s way. Imagine the pit crew member who is in charge of changing the tire somehow cutting off the one in charge of refueling. It would be pure chaos. Fantastic pit crews are a little like a ballet. Every member has their own timing and their own movements and they must understand how that timing and movement work around one another to create a masterpiece. They’re expected to perform their roles perfectly without getting in the way of anyone else who is doing their role.

Great IT organizations also have well-defined roles and clear processes. Everyone understands who is doing what, when, and how it contributes to the overall goals of the company. Members of excellent IT organizations also have a clear understanding of how every role works together in a process. As a result, everyone is empowered to complete their part of the process to the best of their ability.

3. Identify bottlenecks and weaknesses
Racing at the Indy 500 level isn’t about driving as fast as you can. It’s about eliminating as many mistakes as possible to shave off as many seconds as possible. Minor mistakes or bottlenecks can ruin races and pit crews are trained to continually identify and eliminate any bottlenecks.

IT organizations also have to be continually identifying areas for improvement and creating solutions that won’t slow down business growth. When IT organizations prioritize identifying and eliminating bottlenecks, no matter how small, they are able to optimize their speed and success in the long run.

4. They play by the rules
In elite racing, every pit stop is recorded and 8 officials review this footage to determine that everything was performed correctly and within race regulations. If the pit crew’s timing is even one second too early, their driver could be penalized. Pit crews are trained to understand the specific regulations that are in place and learn how to excel within those parameters.

Likewise, excellent IT organizations understand they must work inside business policies. To a certain degree, they must play “office politics”, as well as adhere to procedures that exist outside of the IT organization. They must do this in order to garner support from the other parts of the organization as well as the C-suite. If IT doesn’t understand or follow the rules of the business, they could be penalized by being excluded from strategy discussions or business projects.

5. They use data to drive decisions and create processes so they can stay consistent
This last point is something that many casual racing fans don’t understand about pit crews. It’s also an area where many IT organizations struggle.

In the heat of the race, pit crews don’t have the luxury of being able to figure out what actions to take when something goes wrong. In a sport where there are millions of “worst-case” scenarios, they must plan ahead and create processes for everything. Race crews are constantly monitoring everything about their cars, their drivers and race conditions. They have data on everything and they prepare their pit crews accordingly for various scenarios so that if for whatever reason, an unexpected pit stop occurs, the pit crew doesn’t have to stop to think about what needs to be done. They simply follow the protocol that’s already been set.

Smart IT organizations also use data to drive decisions and leverage defined processes. By doing this, these IT organizations are able to address problems quickly and efficiently, with minimum impact to the business.

How can you apply lessons of a great pit crew?

It’s important to note that no matter how fast race cars become or what technological advancements occur in the sport, winning races will still heavily rely on the success of a pit crew.

The same can be said for IT and the business. Technology will advance and more tools and trends will be introduced to the business. But much of the success of an IT organization will remain on these core tenants as exemplified by pit crews: the ability to work as a team, having well-defined roles, continual improvement, and leveraging data-driven, consistent processes.

This is why good ITSM still matters – and will always matter – for your business.

1.Map value streams
Understand who and what drives value within your business. Map how IT contributes to that value. Remember, each member of the pit crew understands how they contribute to winning a race. Your IT team should also feel the same way!

2. Identify services and define the service portfolio
Mapping value streams will allow you to start to identify services that enable the business to meet its goals. Define your services and include the cost of ownership, needed resources, and the business value of what IT accomplishes. This will help you understand the business of the business and how IT contributes so you can play within the defined rules of the organization.

3. Review current processes
Look for waste in your processes, such as bottlenecks or delays. Eliminate or improve any parts of processes that contribute to these delays. Also, review where a lack of defined processes is holding you back. Identify issues where ownership or roles were unclear and address why that situation occurred.

There is no single “race day” for IT teams, but IT has to always be race-ready. Take the steps now to start getting race-ready. Follow the lead of great pit teams and soon, you’ll be seeing the results of that effort as your business zooms ahead of the competition!

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The Number One Reason IT Is Unappreciated (and how to change it)

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There’s a quiet mumbling that occurs in every IT organization across the world. You can only hear if you listen very carefully. It’s the quiet sounds of IT organizations feeling underappreciated.

The C-Suite and many parts of the organization don’t fully understand what IT does so they pile on projects and hold off on praise. The IT team members get frustrated with their workloads and the thankless nature of the job. If you’re an IT leader, then you have seen this from both sides.

You know that most of the organization sees IT only as a support team and IT feels like they are an order taker. When other departments have unrealistic needs or timelines and IT pushes back, they are seen as resisters who are blocking productivity.

The truth is, many people in the organization don’t understand the complexities of IT and IT team members are so overwhelmed with work that they can’t take the time to explain to other departments how they are contributing to the business.

There is one person in every organization who can help IT feel more appreciated: the IT leader.

IT Is unappreciated because IT can’t clearly communicate its wins and how those wins contribute to the business. The responsibility of communicating these wins falls onto the IT leader.

Let’s take a look at what every IT leader can do to help their team feel more appreciated.

1. Claiming IT wins

Most organizations don’t pay any attention to the IT department until something is falling apart. But IT leaders can help spotlight their teams by sharing wins and updates from their department.

This can be easily done with a regular IT update, either monthly or weekly. Send this to the C-suite or to other leaders in the organization. You may stop me right there and say “Well Doug, I already do that and no one seems to care.” So I’m going to ask you how you framed these wins?

Because, unfortunately, it’s not enough to just share your team’s wins. Unlike the sales department, IT wins don’t always directly relate to revenue. The C-Suite may not understand how improving service desk response times connects to business goals.

As the IT leader, you must be willing to learn to connect each of your team’s wins to the organization’s business goals.

Most people don’t really care what you do unless it affects them. This isn’t just in business. This applies to everything in life. Think of it this way. If you live in Indiana, you may not care about a thunderstorm in Miami. But you will care if you have a flight booked to Miami and that thunderstorm is delaying your vacation.

As the leader, you need to show your organization how that thunderstorm in Miami is affecting someone in Indiana.

How does IT impact the rest of the organization’s ability to do their jobs and hit their goals? This is the question you must regularly ask yourself when you are reviewing projects and strategies.

When you view your team’s wins or accomplishments through the scope of the rest of the organization, you can better communicate them to others so that they care about those wins. This brings me to our next point.

2. Speak business language

In this digital day and age, it is required for IT projects to link to business outcomes and value. Most IT leaders use technology terms that business leaders don’t understand and really, don’t care about. IT often communicates backward. IT loves technology and features and think others do as well. But most others in the organization will only care about the benefits and outcomes of using the technology. The function of technology is not the value. The features are not the outcomes. It’s necessary to focus on the outcomes of every project.

Be willing to look at the data of projects from start to finish. Many organizations justify IT projects by citing anticipated revenue increases or advances in customer satisfaction but many are unable to track these successes after the project is completed. Work with other departments to understand how your IT work contributed to their win.

As an exercise, we recommend dividing a piece of paper into three columns. Label the columns features, benefits and outcomes. Then under each project, service or product, break down them down into each category. You’ll be able to develop value-driven messaging when you view your projects through this lens.

3. Get over the fear of self-promotion

Many leaders struggle with self-promotion but it runs rampant in IT. There is no easy way to release this fear other than to recognize that if you cannot clearly explain how your team is winning, no one else will be able to either.

As a leader, when you self-promote, you are doing so for the benefit of your team members. It’s not bragging or selfish. It’s improving your department and it can improve the entire organization.

When your organization works well. the entire organization runs better. Not only that but when you claim your wins, the organization feels more confident in their own wins and can own them as well. 

If promoting your department truly isn’t for you, there is another option. Many organizations have started hiring IT communications specialists to help market the IT department internally. If you don’t have the budget for it, you may want to enlist help from your marketing department to learn how to better market IT.

4. Be visible

A frequent mistake made by IT leaders is they feel they are too busy to participate in interdepartmental meetings.

While it is tempting to choose to do the work over promoting the work, no one will ever know what you and your team is doing if you are too busy to attend the meetings. No one will know what you’re doing if you’re too busy to attend meetings.

If you want a seat at the table, it’s important to act like you want a seat at the table. Of course, you may point out that you don’t get invited to the high-level meetings. Well, if they don’t give you a seat at the table, you can make one.

Connect with other department leads, form alliances when necessary and support other departments in their goals. These other leaders can help act as a champion for IT when you are unavailable.

If you absolutely cannot be visible and have no choice but to remain in your own department, I recommend being active on emails and quick to respond to voicemails.

5. Training your team to do the same

Finally, it’s important that every IT leader teaches their team to communicate their wins and share the business value of IT. Your team can act as IT department evangelists if you empower them to repeat these steps at their level.

When you talk about your services to your team, identify them in terms of business value and outcomes. Encourage your team to share their wins in your team meetings and ask them about the business value of their wins so that they have a better understanding of how to explain their projects.

How can good SM help IT become appreciated?

1. Defining IT services in terms of business value and outcomes. 

Define and describe the business value and results that your business colleagues get from doing their IT business with you. Remember that PCs and smartphones can be obtained anywhere so you need a case for why they need to go through the IT organization. Create a service portfolio that establishes an understanding of how the business is using technology solutions from IT and how that technology contributes to the business outcome

2. Implementing processes that facilitate, not control, getting work done.

Don’t allow your process to kill your productivity. Too many processes are designed and implemented with “control” in mind. Good process design should enable, not constrain, getting things done. Work with your team to evaluate your processes and measure if they are the most effective way to get the work done.

3. Formalize the business relationship management approach.

Business relationship management focuses on the relationship between the IT organization and the business it serves, as well as the level of satisfaction with IT. Proactively building positive, business-like relationship with key stakeholders helps change the perception of IT from “order taker” to “business differentiator”. 

As much as we don’t want to admit it, there’s politics at play in every organization. IT leaders can hide behind their computers and stay overwhelmed or they can learn to step out and own their team’s wins and communicate their teams’ value.

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What is DevOps?

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“What is DevOps?”

Taken at face value, the question may seem a bit rhetorical, but allow me to explain.

There is no single definition of “DevOps”. If you ask five people “What is DevOps?”, you’ll likely get five different answers.

Need some examples?

Here’s how Gartner has defined DevOps[1]: “A change in IT culture, focusing on rapid IT service delivery through the adoption of agile, lean practices in the context of a system-oriented approach.  DevOps emphasizes people (and culture), and seeks to improve collaboration between operations and development teams.  DevOps implementations utilize technology – especially automation tools that can leverage an increasingly programmable and dynamic infrastructure from a life cycle perspective.”

 Take a look at “The DevOps Handbook[2] by Gene Kim and others.  It states that DevOps is “…the outcome of applying the most trusted principles from the domain of physical manufacturing and leadership to the IT value stream.  DevOps relies on bodies of knowledge from Lean, Theory of Constraints, the Toyota Production System, resilience engineering, learning organizations, safety culture, human factors, and many others…the result is world-class quality, reliability, stability, and security at ever lower cost and effort; and accelerated flow and reliability throughout the technology value stream, including Product Management, Development, QA, IT Operations, and InfoSec.”

 One of my favorite definitions is from Rob England (aka “The IT Skeptic”). Rob describes DevOps as follows[3] : “Agile is the approach of working with complex systems anywhere. Lean is the approach of optimizing the flow of work anywhere. DevOps is the application of Agile and Lean to the acceleration of value work through IT.”

DevOps Defined?

Perhaps the best definition of DevOps is credited to Jez Humble, one of the co-authors of “The DevOps Handbook” who coined the term “CALMS”.[4] CALMS is a conceptual framework for integrating development and operational (DevOps) teams within an organization.  CALMS is an acronym for:

  • Culture – A culture of shared responsibility
  • Automation – Automate as many tasks as possible
  • Lean – Visualization of work-in-progress; limit batch sizes; eliminate waste; continuous improvement, focus on customer value
  • Measurement – Data is collected on everything, with mechanisms for providing visibility into all systems
  • Sharing – There are user-friendly channels for facilitating on-going communications

In most DevOps thinking and reading, CALMS seems to be a common theme.  But I also encounter a lot of DevOps “anti-thinking” as well.

What DevOps is not

Here are a few examples of DevOps “anti-thinking” that I’ve encountered.  DevOps is not:

  • A standard – There is no documented “DevOps” standard.
  • A tool – There are literally hundreds of tools (I’m not sure if this is a good or bad thing) that claim to be “DevOps” tools. The point is buying a tool does not make your organization a “DevOps” organization.
  • A best practice – There is no defined “body of knowledge” or designated reference for DevOps. In fact, there are literally hundreds of books about DevOps, and some (highly visible) examples of organizations that have successfully adopted DevOps thinking. But there is no designated DevOps “best practice”.
  • Just automation – While automation is perhaps one of the most visible aspects of DevOps, automation alone is not “DevOps”.
  • A silver bullet for IT issues – Just saying that you’re “doing” DevOps is not the same as addressing communication issues, collaboration challenges, wasteful processes, poor measurement practices, eliminating technical debt, and other organizational problems.

What is DevOps?

So, what is DevOps?  At its core, DevOps is a mindset; a way of working together. DevOps is:

  • About building trust and teamwork, sharing knowledge, taking accountability – Teams build trust when members can rely upon one another. Trust is built when team members openly and willingly share their knowledge and contribute to the success of the team.  When mistakes happen, the member making the mistake acknowledges the error; but more than that, there is no blame; the team works together to resolve the error.
  • About tearing down the walls that exist between working groups within IT – DevOps can only be successful when all parts of the IT team are part of the success.
  • About creating a culture of experimentation and learning – Too many organizations work in fear of failure. Much about DevOps is about empowering and learning.
  • About improving the productivity of the overall organization – Sometimes that means searching out and eliminating waste or streamlining the process. If it’s taking too long to get code to trunk and then tested, what can be done to improve that?  If standing up a new development environment requires manual intervention, what could be done to standardize that work so that manual intervention is no longer required?

Avoiding DevOps “Ditches”

Knowing what DevOps is and is not will help you get on the road to success. Here are five ditches to avoid to achieve success with DevOps.

  • Purchasing and implementing tools before anything else – DevOps adoptions taking this approach usually fall into the old “hammer and nail” syndrome (“when all you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail”). Well, just because you own a hammer and can swing it doesn’t make you a carpenter.  One of the most common mistakes with DevOps adoption is too much focus on tool implementation and automation of (often poorly or even undefined) processes. When all you have done is implement a tool without designing processes or developing teams, you’ve not “DevOps”- you’re just using a tool – and likely not getting the full benefit of that tool.
  • Getting hung up on semantics – Developers and operations both have developed their own specific languages for what each group does – and this often causes confusion. Take the time to define and agree on a shared terminology.
  • Developers running over everyone else in the organization under the flag of “we’re doing DevOps” – Once, while at a client site, I heard a “DevOps engineer” (seriously) tell a sysadmin that “I’m about to automate you out of a job.” Not a very collaborative, teamwork attitude, huh?  DevOps is about building teams whose members trust and rely on each other- not trying to dominate or control.
  • Arbitrarily throwing out existing process and procedures – Although a process may not be performing as effectively and efficiently as desired, don’t overlook the fact that there was a good reason why that process was defined and implemented in the first place. In my experience, process design and implementations have been treated as “one time” activities and rarely revisited to identify improvements or needed changes.  Before getting rid of an existing process, first understand the reason for the process, and if that reason still exists today.  Then look for ways to improve that existing process, rather than just throwing it away.
  • Ignoring the need for organizational change – DevOps adoption represents a significant change in the way IT does its work. Without good communication, appropriate training, and a shift to a “thinking / experimentation / learning” mindset, DevOps adoption will fail.

Keep CALMS and DevOps on

Knowing what DevOps is and is not is key for success in adopting DevOps.  Following the CALMS model ensures that you’re addressing the complete extent of DevOps adoption, and not just being fixated on a single aspect.

Need help answering the question “What is DevOps?”  Want to build a fundamental understanding of DevOps?  Tedder Consulting offers the DASA-accredited DevOps Fundamentals class.  Visit  our training page to register for an upcoming class! 

For more pragmatic advice and service management insight, click here to subscribe to my newsletter!

Picture Credit: Pixabay

[1] https://www.gartner.com/it-glossary/devops , retrieved 8/11/2018.

[2] Kim, Gene, et al. “The DevOps Handbook”. IT Revolution Press, LLC. 2016. Portland, OR

[3] http://www.itskeptic.org/content/laymans-definition-devops, retrieved 8/11/2018.

[4] https://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/CALMS , retrieved 8/11/2018.

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Nine signs that it’s time to expand ITSM into the Enterprise

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I read a lot about how organizations have stood up a centralized service desk, a self-service portal, and called that “enterprise service management”.

While these two deliverables may be good things to do, I don’t think that these two deliverables in and of themselves represent “enterprise service management”.  Such an approach only perpetuates what many organizations have done with ITSM – just address the (relatively easy) operational aspects of service management, without doing any of the needed work to identify and underpin the end-to-end flow of value within IT.

What expanding ITSM could do for the enterprise

Having said that, I do think that expanding ITSM into the enterprise could have a significant and positive impact on the organization.

Expanding good ITSM into the organization would standardize how work gets done.  Standardized work improves both the productivity and the throughput of work through the organization.

ITSM would bring clarity and transparency into how value flows through the organization.  Good ITSM would result in the identification and definition of services and processes that underpin the organizational value streams of a business.

Good ITSM across the enterprise would bring repeatability, reliability, and measurability to all aspects of the organization.

All of the above are good things that expanding ITSM could do for the enterprise.

But how do you know its time to expand ITSM into the enterprise?

Nine signs that it may be time to expand ITSM beyond IT

Here are my top nine signs (in no particular order) that it may be time to expand ITSM beyond IT.

  1. Published IT performance reports depict business measures or results, not IT or technology metrics. Published reports reflect success measures that are outcome-based and relevant and meaningful to the business.
  2. Business colleagues outside of IT take an active, engaged role in service management activities. Business colleagues actively participate in CAB meetings; the ITSM steering committee has significant participation from business colleagues, and some (most) services have a service owner that does not work within IT.
  3. IT is a valued contributor and partner in business strategy development. The IT service portfolio is regularly reviewed by key business decision-makers and is a critical input to technology investment decisions, work prioritization, and managing demand.    IT personnel – at all levels of the organization – participate in business strategy and planning meetings.
  4. The IT-Business relationship is one of being “colleagues”, not “service provider and customer”.  With IT and business colleagues working as an integrated entity, efforts are focused on the true customer – the person or business that ultimately buys a company’s products and services.
  5. Business colleagues have a consistently good experience in their interactions with the IT organization. Performance is predictable and consistent. Communications are appropriate, relevant, and timely.  Issues are addressed and managed in a professional manner.  There are active, positive business – IT relationships.
  6. The IT organization is working as an integrated team. There are no “Dev vs. Ops vs. QA vs. Security” attitudes within IT, but rather a culture of collaboration. The IT organization has recognized that there is no “one size fits all approach” and has learned how to effectively incorporate and leverage the strengths of different methodologies to deliver business value.
  7. ITSM processes are lean, effective, and provide “just enough” control. Processes are as simple as possible, friction-free, and have little, if any, waste.  Roles and responsibilities are clearly defined, understood, and embraced.  Processes facilitate getting work done, rather than act as a barrier to getting work done.
  8. The IT organization acts and communicates in business terms. The service catalog articulates what IT does in terms of business value and outcomes. IT consistently demonstrates good business acumen. The business relationship management function is established and proactively ensures that the business realizes value from its investments in IT.
  9. IT promotes and communicates how ITSM is benefitting the organization. ITSM successes (and learnings) are regularly publicized – and the business is feeling the positive impact from ITSM implementation and use.

But even if all nine (or most) of these signs are present, it still may not make sense to expand ITSM into the enterprise.

The ultimate sign that it’s time to expand ITSM into the enterprise

What is the ultimate sign that it’s time to expand ITSM into the enterprise?

Your business colleagues ask for it.

Just because IT thinks this is a good idea isn’t sufficient justification for expanding ITSM across the enterprise.  Expanding ITSM into the enterprise must be a business initiative, not an IT initiative forced upon the business. Why?

Business colleagues may not know anything about ITSM.  They may not even be aware that the IT organization is doing service management.  But, business colleagues feel that they have consistent, good experiences in their interactions with IT.  They get real business value from services delivered from IT. They see how wider use of the concepts being used by IT can benefit the organization.  And, most importantly, they want to expand those concepts across the enterprise.

But to have success with expanding ITSM concepts into the enterprise, Enterprise Service Management (ESM) is not as simple as dropping the ‘IT’ and adding an ‘E’. The business must own ESM.   The business must dedicate and invest resources to ESM.  There must be commitment to ESM being successful.  There must be a willingness to do the required “care-and-feeding” across the organization, not just within a department or two.  The enterprise must adopt an attitude of continual improvement.

Getting ready to expand ITSM into the enterprise

While there is much that can be leveraged from a good ITSM implementation to jumpstart an ESM implementation, here are six steps that will ensure that ESM will be successful.

  • Build the compelling business caseBusiness value consists of five factors – increased revenue, decreased cost, improved productivity, competitive differentiation, and improved customer satisfaction. The business case for ESM must address at least one of these five factors; doing so will help you get the support and funding needed for ESM.
  • Form a cross-functional team – Again, ESM has to be a business initiative. This means that a cross-functional team consisting of both business colleagues and IT staff are required for ESM success.
  • Identify enterprise-level services – An IT service only depicts the “middle part” of an enterprise-level service. There are business activities that occur both before and after the IT service is consumed. What are those activities? Who is accountable for the quality and results of those activities?  Identifying and defining enterprise-level services is critical for ESM success.
  • Identify organizational value streamsHow does work get done across the enterprise? Just like an IT service often involves multiple parts of the IT organization, the same can be said for enterprise services.  Rarely (if ever) does an outcome or result delivered to the customer only involve a single department or work group within an organization. ESM must underpin an organization’s delivery of value.
  • Define good processes – IT’s expertise in defining good ITSM processes can be leveraged to help the enterprise identify and document its processes. But processes must facilitate, not control, getting work done. This may represent a mind shift change for those new to service management.
  • Take an iterative approach – As with ITSM implementation, ESM implementation must be an iterative activity. Start with a smaller enterprise value stream.  Define and apply service management concepts, learn what worked well, identify improvements, then repeat the cycle with the next enterprise value stream. There is no need to “boil the ocean” – make steady, incremental progress toward ESM goals.  Adoption and success will be much greater.

The digital consumer is demanding that businesses act as unified entities, rather than collections of parts.  This means that all parts of an organization must collaborate to deliver the value and results that the digital consumer wants.  Expanding good ITSM into the enterprise is a way to meet the demands of both the digital consumer and the digital economy.

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Why your company isn’t so excited (but should be!) about ESM

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Enterprise Service Management (ESM) describes the use of service processes and technologies across an organization.  ESM also describes business management software which provides an integrated view into business practices. [1]

And what part of any organization doesn’t rely on the use of processes and technology for running its business?  None!

But organizations have traditionally taken a departmental or system-based approach to processes and technology.  Such an approach usually focuses on the needs of a specific department, or those directly impacted by the implementation of a system.  Rarely (if ever!) does this approach address the entirety of a value chain, or the movement of work and information from a point-of-origin through the point-of-consumption.  Value chains within an organization typically involve multiple departments.  But because of a disjointed approach to processes and technology, work efforts are usually disjointed, and the organization works as a collection of parts.

ESM could fix that, as a good ESM implementation would facilitate and integrate the flow of information and activities within an organization.

Why your company needs ESM

The idea of ESM is not new, but there is now a renewed focus on the need for ESM.  Why is ESM suddenly so important?  I would argue that the most compelling reason why ESM is so important is the customer – especially in the context of today’s digital world.

A challenge often encountered by customers today is that one part of the company is unaware of what the other parts are doing, much less how their activities impact or depend on those other parts.  As a result, departments within companies often tend to work in isolation without regard for any upstream or downstream processes.  Things simply fall through the cracks.

And in the digital age, customers simply will not deal with organizations that act in this manner.  They will quickly (and quietly) move along.

An effective ESM implementation can result in an organization acting and working as an integrated enterprise.   Done well, ESM enables a frictionless and differentiated customer experience, as it reinforces an enterprise-wide, process-oriented approach for providing value to a customer.  By underpinning an organization’s value streams, ESM:

  • Can help identify and ensure that proper interfaces between individual systems are in place.
  • Brings clarity to the organization and breaks down internal barriers and silos.
  • Results in clearly defined and integrated value streams across the organization, not just within a department.
  • Brings transparency, consistency, and measurability into the movement of work and information across the organization.
  • Reflects the true picture of end-to-end service delivery.

Sounds great, right?  So why isn’t your company excited about ESM?

What is in the way of ESM?

ESM adoption has its own set of unique challenges.

  • Success with ESM will require a change in organizational behaviors. The internal service provider/customer model utilized in many organizations must end.  The “customer” is outside of the organization, and all parts of the organization must collaborate to deliver products and services to that customer.
  • Most organizational structures are hierarchical – which is a barrier to collaboration. A hierarchical organizational structure is typically pre-disposed to not collaborate with other parts of the organization.  This is because most organizational compensation and recognition schemes are focused inwardly on departmental goals and objectives and not enterprise goals.
  • Organizations lack defined, enterprise-wide business processes. Business processes are typically defined only at the departmental or team level and tend to focus only on a particular domain or area.  How business processes interface is at best poorly defined, if defined at all.
  • Technology has been used as a band-aid. Because organizations took a departmental approach to process and technology use, additional technology was often deployed to close the gaps between disparate systems within the enterprise.
  • Lack of clarity regarding organizational value streams. No single part of an organization is independent of the rest of the organization; It takes all parts of an organization to deliver value to its customers.  But often, there is no clarity or ownership regarding value streams within an organization.

Don’t repeat the ITSM sins of the past with ESM

Some organizations have approached ESM as just an extension of their current IT Service Management (ITSM) implementations.  I would agree that many ITSM concepts, such as having a centralized service desk and taking a coordinated response to service requests and interruptions, are applicable across the enterprise.  But I would also argue that for many organizations, if the ESM implementation mimics the approach taken for ITSM implementation, ESM will fail.  Why?  Because many ITSM implementations just aren’t delivering on their potential.

  • Many ITSM implementations only addressed operational issues and not the entire IT value stream. As a result, ITSM became a barrier, rather than an enabler, for working within IT.
  • ITSM was driven as an IT initiative, not as a business initiative. Rather than identifying, promoting, and delivering business value, ITSM became an obstacle for getting IT to do any work for the business.
  • IT services were defined as “things that IT does” and not in terms of business value and outcomes. As a result, there is no clear definition or shared understanding of how IT provides business value. To the rest of the organization, IT appears to be a cost center, not a value enabler.

Three things to do to get ready for ESM

To really make a positive impact, ESM must be more than just establishing an enterprise service desk or rolling out a self-service portal.  ESM has to reflect and support the true end-to-end delivery of products and services throughout the enterprise.  But ESM will require strong management commitment and an investment of time and resources.  It will not get done overnight.  So how do you get started?  Here’s my tips for getting ready for ESM:

  • Work on getting your ITSM house in order. IT is one of the few organizations within an enterprise that has a true enterprise view of the organization.  If current ITSM processes are ineffective, or if services are poorly defined, now is the opportunity to improve and learn.  The knowledge and skills you gain from making those improvements will be valuable as your organization begins its ESM journey.  Your business colleagues will also notice the improvements as well – this is critical, because you’re going to need their support.
  • Become an expert on the business of the business. This means learning the language of the business; what the business does to deliver value to the customer; understanding how the parts of the business interact to deliver that value to the customer.  Tools like COPIS (or “backward SIPOC”) diagrams are useful for capturing how value is delivered from the customer perspective back into the organization (in other words, from the outside-in).  This will also help you gain the support and credibility you’ll need from your business colleagues.
  • Develop a strong, compelling business case. Perhaps the most important question to answer is “Why should your company implement ESM?”. How will the gains in effectiveness and efficiency from ESM adoption translate into bottom line impact across the enterprise?  Perhaps ESM will result in improvements in the cost per sale or unit.  Maybe ESM will result in the reduction of lead times for product or service delivery.  Whatever the impacts may be, your business case must articulate the clear value proposition in terms of increased revenues, decreased costs, improved productivity, company differentiation, or improved customer satisfaction.

The digital age demands that organizations execute as frictionless, integrated enterprises. But to do so will require many companies to rethink how they are organized and how they collaborate to deliver both customer and business value.  Done well, ESM will transform organizations from “collections of parts” to an integrated, customer-focused enterprises, providing both an outstanding customer experience and improvements in efficiency and effectiveness.

Worried that your ESM efforts will fall into the “bad ITSM” trap?  Want to make sure that your leverage, not abandon,  your ITSM investments as you expand  into ESM?  Let us introduce you to VeriSM – the service management approach for the Digital Age.   Tedder Consulting can help you leverage VeriSM to achieve ESM – contact us today!

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Picture Credit: Pixabay

[1] Wikipedia, retrieved May 30, 2018.

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